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Quality Health Care and You - Diabetes

Blood Pressure Control

What it is

As the heart pumps blood through the arteries and circulatory system of the body, it creates a certain amount of pressure on the walls of the arteries. This is called blood pressure.

How it Relates to Diabetes

A whopping 70% of diabetics have high blood pressure, which is a form of cardiovascular disease and the leading cause of early death among diabetics. Sadly, at least 65% of people with diabetes die from some form of cardiovascular disease, commonly heart disease or stroke.

The Quality Standard - How to Know You're Okay

Your health care provider should check your blood pressure at every visit. If they don't, ask them to do it - it only takes a minute. To lower the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, it has been recommended by the American Diabetes Association that diabetics should keep their blood pressure below 130/80 mmHg.

What You Can Do

If you have high blood pressure, talk to your doctor about how it can be lowered using a combination of diet, exercise and medications. Medications can be very effective at lowering blood pressure. The two common classes are called "ACE inhibitors" (such as lisinopril, trandolapril, enalapril) or "angiotensin receptor blockers or ARBs" (such as valsartan, losartan, or candesartan). Staying fit is important too. Your diet and exercise program is good for sugar control and also to keep your blood pressure in the best range.

To Learn More

Hope Through Research - You Can Be Part of the Answer!

Many research studies are underway to help us learn about eye diseases. Would you like to find out more about being part of this exciting research? Please visit the following links:

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This article is a NetWellness exclusive.

Last Reviewed: Dec 07, 2012

David C Aron, MD, MS David C Aron, MD, MS
Professor of Medicine
School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University

Bette K Idemoto, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CCRN Bette K Idemoto, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CCRN
Clinical Nurse Specialist
Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing
Case Western Reserve University