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Alzheimer's Disease

Medicating with Exelon

12/21/2000

Question:

My father was just prescribed Exelon after taking Aricept for about two years. I was hoping to find out more about Exelon and whether or not the two week waiting period between the drugs will be problematic for my dad.

Answer:

Hello, Thank you for submitting your question to us. We hope you find the following information provided by Dr. David Geldmacher helpful and useful. "Exelon is more similar than different when compared to Aricept. Although the company`s representatives often claim that it offers superior efficacy for memory symptoms, the data does not support this argument and the FDA has not approved this claim. In general, Exelon`s side effects occur more frequently, but they are not necessarily more severe than Aricept`s side effects. So far, all the drugs of this class (Aricept, Exelon, Cognex, and the soon to be released Reminyl) show similar results on memory tests. They differ on issues of tolerability (side effects) and ease of use (ranging from once to four times daily). Many people with AD tolerate discontinuation of any of these medicines poorly. An unsolved problem for prescribers is the paradox that if a person fares poorly when Aricept is stopped, that means it was working. If we wait too long to start it or another drug back up, the ground that is lost during the stoppage is often not regained. For more information click on the first website listed below." Again, thank you very much for your question. If we can be of any further assistance to you, please don`t hesitate to contact us again.

Related Resources:

Memory and Cognition Center

For more information:

Go to the Alzheimer's Disease health topic, where you can:

Response by:

Paula K Ogrocki, PhD Paula K Ogrocki, PhD
Assistant Professor of Neurology
School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University

David   Geldmacher, MD David Geldmacher, MD
Formerly, Assistant Professor of Neurology
School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University