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Rehabilitation

Head trauma and low barometric pressure

07/05/2006

Question:

Hi, I have been all over the web trying to find an answer to this puzzle. There is no money for doctors. I was in a head on crash two years ago. I am a TBI survivor. I have a real problem with falling barometric pressure. My mind turns dark and a depression-like state comes (29.5x inches is the lowest and worst under "normal" conditions - we don`t want to talk about hurricanes). High pressure is best. 30.12 inches is nice. Right now it is 30.23 and my head feels compressed, but, I will take this over the low pressure scenario any day. If the math is looked at, a difference of 1/3 of a pound per square inch MORE, makes all the difference between the lowest normal, and 30.12 inches. Any ideas? So far, the only physical item found was a slight tear bewteen c-2 and c-3 vertebra. Head trauma / post concussion syndrome with the usual list of cognative problems was diagnosed and an onset of moderate psychosis (hearing voices) began 6 months after the crash.

 

Answer:

It is difficult to make an appropriate diagnosis, or an appropriate suggestion for rehabilitation over the Internet, especially with something as complex and heterogenous as TBI. However, there are many resource available for TBI patients. First, you should be seeing a physiatrist who specializes in TBI. As you may be aware, a physiatrist is a physician who specializes in rehabilitation, and it happens that some are trained to work with and diagnose people with the impairments that you may have.

Secondly, there are several federally funded TBI model systems scattered across the country. These centers are funded to not only perform research on TBI but also to act as a resource for people like yourself. You can visit http://www.tbindsc.org/ to find a list of these centers.

For more information:

Go to the Rehabilitation health topic, where you can:

Response by:

Stephen J Page, PhD Stephen J Page, PhD
Director of Research, Associate Professor
Drake Center
University of Cincinnati