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COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease)

COPD

12/05/2008

Question:

I had just been told I have COPD. I am 42, and have been smoking since I was 16. I smoke about a pack to 2 packs a day. I have problems breathing already when I do like activity, such as cooking, walking to the mail box and things like that. I have had my lungs colaspe 3 times in a 5 year period. I`m trying to find out if I don`t get help for the COPD, how much time do I have before it will kill me? Sincerely.

Answer:

Thank you for visiting NetWellness. On this site, NetWellness experts try to answer general questions about health. A health professional familiar with all of the aspects of your case could provide more complete answers to your questions. However, NetWellness may have some general information available that you can access through our search feature.

The course of COPD is not easy to predict. In general, people who develop COPD at an early age should be evaluated by a lung specialist and also be evaluated for inherited causes of COPD that get worse with smoking. The most important thing for people with COPD to do is to quit smoking. Smoking cessation is the best way to live longer with COPD.

There are many treatments available to help with shortness of breath for people who have COPD. There are also treatments that can help prevent recurrent lung collapse. A pulmonologist or lung specialist is an expert in COPD who can help evaluate your breathing, help with medications, and talk about smoking cessation.

For more information:

Go to the COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) health topic, where you can:

Response by:

Michael E Ezzie, MD Michael E Ezzie, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep
College of Medicine
The Ohio State University