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Infertility

Lighter periods after hysteropalpinogram

07/07/2009

Question:

Hi. I am 38 years old. I am single and not trying to get pregnant right now (althought I would love to in the future, which is the reason for my question). I had 2 abortions when I was twenty and IUD right after (all out of US), so I had hysterosalpinogram just to make sure everything was fine (I also had blood test for hormons). All results, incuding HSG test were good. This is my question: I always had very heavy periods (not painfull) that lasted about 5-6 days, and now suddenly for the 3rd time (after the HSG test/procedure) my periods are much lighter and they last 3-4 days (first two I got after 24 days, and this third one after 28 days, which is more normal cycle for me), so I am little bit worried. Is it posible that my periods are lighter because of HSG? Is that normal and would they go back to havy at some point? I also started excercising again about 2 months ago (after few years, my weight is always the same about 130p, I am 5`9"). Not that I am looking forward to havy periods, but since I want to have a baby, i found this bit alarming, I guess at 38 any change is unwelcome. What do you think? What could be the reason for lighter period and should I be worried? Thank you very much.

Answer:

Lighter periods are often an indication that you did not ovulate that cycle. In addition, short cycles (24 days) often mean you did not ovulate. Some women in their late 30's do not ovulate as regularly as they did when they were younger. It also could be a result of other things beside age such as weight gain or a subtle hormone problem. A HSG does not cause anovulation or light periods. If your periods return to normal, you should not be concerned. If they remain light with short cycles, you might want to see a reproductive endocrinologist for evaluation of your hormones, particularly if you are trying to get pregnant.

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Response by:

William W Hurd, MD William W Hurd, MD
Professor of Reproductive Biology
School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University