Home HealthTopics Health Centers Reference Library Research
Join us on Facebook Join us on Facebook Share on Facebook

Amputation

What Can I Say?

11/11/2009

Question:

After an EMG identified the extent of my carpal tunnel problem as severe in my LH and moderatly severe in the RH., I had release surgery that wasn`t sucsessful on my LH, in 2007. The surgeon said they had nothing else to offer. Late last summer, an accident resulted in losing app 1/2 " of three fingertips on each hand thumb, index, middle. In everything from appling for disability to my own family, I am ignored when I explain the CTS( there is 0 conduction in my median nerves etc). and amputation which included the bones, makes doing almost anything I used to with my hands impossible. While the bandages are off my fingers, my big hands look almost normal. Is there anything I can download to explain the limitations that people with severe CTS combined with partial amputations like this may have problems with? Signing my name using my initials is the limit of my writing skills. Thanks in advance Go buckeyes! m from ann arbor

Answer:

I've accessed a number of different websites (including NetWellness), using various Internet search engines, but haven't come across anything for you to download.

If your physician has nothing else to recommend for treatment of your carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) on either side, consider obtaining a second opinion, including to find out why surgery didn't help (for example, to be sure there's not another problem - in addition to CTS). There are a number of treatment options for CTS besides surgery, including treating any underlying condition which may be present that could predispose a person to developing CTS.

If not already done so, consulting and working with an Occupational Therapist, preferably a Certified Hand Therapist who would have additional expertise, would be essential to maximize your functional levels, including considering the almost infinite variety of adaptive equipment and assistive devices (including possibly a hand splint to keep your thumb in a functional position) which can enhance function. Then, once all further medical and therapy interventions have been implemented and your function maximized, you could then undergo a Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE), which would objectively determine the full extent of your physical abilities and limitations.

For more information:

Go to the Amputation health topic, where you can:

Response by:

Brian L Bowyer, MD Brian L Bowyer, MD
Clinical Associate Professor
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
College of Medicine
The Ohio State University