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Pulmonary Fibrosis

Parenchymal Fibrosis

01/11/2010

Question:

Hi I am 26 years old and I recently had an x-ray. Findings stated: “A short obliquely oriented linear is seen in the lower lung field. No other frank parenchymal infiltrates are noted. The pulmonary vascular pattern is within normal. The Cardiac shadow is not enlarged. The diaphragm, both lateral costophrenic sulci, and the bony thorax is unremarkable. Impression: Parenchymal fibrosis, left lower lung field.”

I just need a layman’s term explanation for this. Thank you

Answer:

Parenchymal fibrosis means scar in the lung. If the scar is in one small area of one part of the lung, then it is most commonly due to previous injury such as pneumonia or trauma. Most of these areas of scar do not get worse over time and cause little or no symptoms.

When fibrosis is more widespread throughout both lungs, then a condition called interstitial lung disease is possible. This is a more serious condition that can get worse over time. However, it would be very unusual to have interstitial lung disease that only involved a small area of one side of the lung.

For more information:

Go to the Pulmonary Fibrosis health topic, where you can:

Response by:

James N Allen, Jr, MD James N Allen, Jr, MD
Clinical Professor of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine
College of Medicine
The Ohio State University