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Dental and Oral Health (Adults)

Bumps on Each Side of Lingual Frenum

05/03/2010

Question:

Hello,

Just a couple of days ago, I noticed I have two bumps on my lingual frenum, towards the bottom, that wasn`t there before. They don`t loo white in color, more like swollen bumps. It can be irritating to painful when I curl my tongue and try to touch the roof of my mouth. However, it is not at all painful most of the time, just something I can feel are there.

I have noticed that I`ve been suffering from allergies and have trouble sleeping at night due to nasal drip and a stuffy nose. In the morning, I usually have to blow my nose real good and then I`m good for the rest of the day. Could this be a connection?

I have never smoked or dipped.

Answer:

There can be a couple of possible explanations for what you are describing. It seems that you have looked up online "floor of mouth" or "tongue: on wiki or google images, in order to relate your findings to the "lingula frenum".

The floor of the mouth has 2 different major salivary glands (SubLingual and SubMandibular) that empty on both sides of the lingual frenum. The SubMandibular duct orifice is located at the base of the lingual frenum (Submandibular Carruncle). In addition to the major glands, there are also interspersed minor salivary glands (3-4000 individual glands in the oral cavity). Sometimes the gland ducts become traumatized or irritated and the ductal tissues retrograde to the duct orifice swell, and a fluid vesicle results (mucocele/ranula/"Frog Belly"). These normally will dissipate and the "bumps" go away with time, but in some cases may return and require surgical intervention to alleviate the blockage.

It may be possible that allergic responses may facilitate blockage secondarily to inflammation, but highly unlikely. The swelling and pain associated with salivary duct blockage can be severe and greatest just before eating when salivary flow is at its greatest.

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Response by:

Richard J Jurevic, DDS, PhD Richard J Jurevic, DDS, PhD
Formerly, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences
School of Dental Medicine
Case Western Reserve University