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Lung Cancer

Could it be Cancer

03/18/2011

Question:

I`m 30 year old male live in southwest Virginia. No family history of cancer. I have never smoked and do not drink or use any drugs. I have always been healthy. 4 years ago I had stomach pains and my doctor ordered a ct scan. the scan showed A small calcified granuloma in the right lower lobe of my lung, Several tiny punctuate calcifications in my spleen, and tiny punctuate calcifications in the femoral head along with a small bone Island present. My doctor said all of those findings are benign and to not worry about them. I was diagnosed with IBS. I know it has been 4 years since this happen but I still have a thought in the back of my head that I could have cancer. So being that I had those findings in that many areas of my body is that normal and are those benign finding or should I have another CT Scan and check to see if anything has changed or since it has been so many years should I not worry about it and move on with life. I have two kids and a wonderful wife but I get stressed out thinking that I might have something going on inside of me even though my doctor along with another one said I`m fine and to not worry about it. Thank you for your time and I hope your answer will help me. God Bless You

Answer:

Calcified lesions are in most cases benign. Given that you have calcified lesions in the spleen as well and you are only 30, this most likely is a old histoplasmosis infection, which is completely benign. And that is the reason why your physician told you not to worry. As a thirty year old you are very young and since you are a non smoker your risk for lung cancer is close to zero. I understand the anxiety that you are going through. However, I think it is reasonable to discuss with your physician to repeat a CT scan of chest to make sure there is no progression (which most likely is the case) in the past four years so you can stop thinking about these benign lesions.

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Response by:

Shaheen  Islam, MD, MPH Shaheen Islam, MD, MPH
Clinical Associate Professor
Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep
Hematology
College of Medicine
The Ohio State University